Established in 2006, NC IDEA focused primarily on making grants directly to young technology companies. In July 2015, we converted to a private foundation, with an expanded ambition to support the entrepreneurial ecosystems and economic potential of entrepreneurs in North Carolina through additional support to organizations across the state also engaged in NC IDEA’s mission.

2017

NC IDEA rebrands Groundwork Labs accelerator program to NC IDEA Labs

2016

NC IDEA launches the Ecosystem Partner Grant Program, granting $1.25 million to 10 organizations that impact entrepreneurs across North Carolina

2016

SoarTriangle is integrated into NC IDEA

2016

NC IDEA makes it’s 100th Seed Grant

2016

Thom Ruhe becomes CEO of NC IDEA

2015

NC IDEA converts to non-profit private foundation

2015

David Rizzo, founding CEO of NC IDEA, retires

2015

Groundwork Labs is integrated into NC IDEA

2014

SoarTriangle (founded by Lauren Whitehurst, Vicki Gibbs, Kimberly Jenkins, Adam Klein, and John Austin) is launched with funding from Google for Entrepreneurs and support of American Underground

2012

Groundwork Labs is launched with funding from NC IDEA and American Underground

2010

NC IDEA provides funding to Joystick Labs, a video game accelerator program

2006

NC IDEA makes its first seven seed grants to CardioVascular Resonances, DeltaSphere, Illuminus, ImagineOptix, InsituTec, TransLoc and ZumaTek

2005

MCNC-RDI splits – selling its research business to RTI and renaming the remaining entity NC IDEA, which becomes a supporting organization of CED

2003

MCNC splits its two remaining businesses into two organizations; MCNC and MCNC-RDI

2002

David Rizzo becomes President of MCNC

2000

Cronos is acquired by JDS Uniphase, creating funding for NC IDEA and MCNC

1999

MCNC, a private nonprofit organization, spins out Cronos Integrated Microsystems

1996

The state legislature instructs MCNC to develop a plan to be self-sufficient by 2000

1980

The Microelectronic Center of North Carolina (MCNC) is established with $24.4 million in state funding, with the goal of attracting semiconductor companies to the state